Jul 29, 2022 Word for Word Media
Dr Shivona Moodley expands on the common terminology that is used in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer in men with 1,4 million new cases being diagnosed in 2020, according to GLOBOCAN statistics. Southern Africa had the third highest worldwide mortality rates from PC. In South Africa, the National Cancer Registry 2014 report confirms that PC is the most common histologically-diagnosed malignancy in non-Caucasians, and the second most common cancer in Caucasians.  Routes of spread  PC starts in the cells of the prostate gland and the most common type of cancer found here is…

Mar 24, 2022 Word for Word Media
Dr Daleen Geldenhuys describes how testicular cancer becomes metastatic and the treatment thereof. Testicular germ cell tumours, broadly classified into seminomas and non-seminomas, are among the most curable cancers, with five-year survival rates of approximately 95%. Men with advanced disease are classified into good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups. The grouping considers the site of the primary cancer as well as the sites of metastatic disease, and serum tumour marker levels.  The primary cancer can be testicular or in the chest. This may sound strange, but it’s thought to be attributed to an abnormal migration of gonadal tissue (cells that are destined to become part of…

Dec 2, 2021 Word for Word Media
Genetic counsellor, Sarah Walters, educates us on the probabilities of inherited genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting men; approximately 1 in 8 men will be diagnosed during their lifetime. Mostly, it’s diagnosed in men aged 65 and older. Risk factors include lifestyle, age, and ethnicity.  Sometimes there is an inherited genetic predisposition to prostate cancer and this may have a considerable impact. Clues to understand whether your family may be at an increased risk include a family history of prostate and other cancers, such as breast cancer (in either men or women), ovarian cancer…

Oct 1, 2021 Word for Word Media
Black men have significant differences in incidence, presentation and outcome of prostate cancer compared to other racial groups. Multiple factors play a role including genetic differences and social determinants of health. Understanding these differences helps us to create better healthcare strategies for black men. Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in SA, surpassing basal cell cancer in the latest National Cancer Registry cancer report (2017).¹ PC is the second most common cause of death through a malignancy in SA, after lung cancer.² Internationally it has been found that black men with PC have worse outcomes than other…

Aug 2, 2021 Word for Word Media
Dr Anthony Smith expands on ways to adapt after prostate cancer treatment so sexual function can be improved and sexual intimacy enhanced. The prostate’s anatomy is central to the nerves, muscles and vessels that supply the genitals so any damage to this area can have profound consequences. Its therefore no surprise that men fear this cancer and its potential to substantially damage their sexuality and masculine identity. So, let’s look at the side effects. Surgical treatments A cornerstone of treatment is a radical prostatectomy, now done as a nerve-sparing procedure which has improved the outcome such that up to 75% of men can expect to…

Aug 2, 2021 Word for Word Media

Mandla Zondo tells us how losing his brother to prostate cancer in the same year he was diagnosed motivated him to lobby hope and in turn co-found CanSurvive Kwa-Thema Support Group. Mandla Zondo (72) lives in Springs, Gauteng. He is married and has two children and six grandchildren.  Mandla started his yearly prostate cancer screening in 2011.  In 2013, his GP referred him to a urologist as he had an enlarged prostate. Mandla’s prostate was so enlarged that it restricted urination and he had to undergo a cystoscopy (endoscopy of the urinary bladder via the urethra). He was then put…

Feb 5, 2021 Word for Word Media
Dr Lizette Louw informs us how PSMA therapy is a rapidly evolving area for metastatic prostate cancer treatment. What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a specialised area consisting of two arms: nuclear imaging which uses small amounts of gamma radiation to examine organ function, and nuclear therapy using alpha or beta particles.  In nuclear imaging, a radioactive atom is linked to specific molecules to guide imaging of specific organ systems. Similarly for nuclear therapy, a therapeutic radioactive atom is linked to various specific molecules which is absorbed by the tumour cells and the radiation is deposited within the…

Feb 5, 2021 Word for Word Media
Prof Shingai Mutambirwa gives us a better notion of what metastatic prostate cancer is and the outcomes of the various metastases. What is metastatic prostate cancer? When cancer cells from the prostate enter the blood and lymph vessels and travel to other parts of the body where they re-implant and grow to form secondary tumours or metastases, this is called metastatic prostate cancer or Stage IV.  At this advanced stage, the cancer is unfortunately no longer curable but can be contained for a period on appropriate therapies. The 5-year cancer specific survival for men diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer hovers between 30-40%.  Various studies…

Nov 30, 2020 Word for Word Media

We hear how the Prostate Cancer Foundation came about and the success of their latest Suit Up September campaign. SA prostate cancer stats Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in South Africa (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer).  If prostate cancer is detected in the early stages, the chance of survival after five years is over 98%. However, if the cancer has spread (metastasised), only approximately 30% of men survive.  Black African men have a 60% higher risk for prostate cancer and are twice as likely than white males to die from the disease.  Early detection through age appropriate…

Nov 30, 2020 Word for Word Media
Dr Nirasha Chiranjan gives us a rundown on the facts about prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is among the most common cancers in men worldwide, with an estimated 1 600 000 cases and 366 000 deaths annually. The incidence generally rising with age; it is more likely to develop in older men, age 65 and older. The overall five-year survival rate is over 98%.  In developed areas, prostate cancer is increasingly being diagnosed when the tumour is confined to the prostate, due at least in part to screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Risk factors Age: The incidence increases after the age…

Jul 29, 2020 Word for Word Media

Solly Moeng tells us how he juggled prostate cancer surgery and work, and how pleased he was when he could get back to his cycling. Solly Moeng (53) lives in Wynberg, Cape Town. He has three children. Work project delays check-up Every year, in April, Solly has a routine medical check-up. During the 2017 exam, the GP casually indicated that Solly’s prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level seemed ‘a bit elevated’ and that he should get it checked.  “There was no urgency in his voice and he mentioned it so nonchalantly that I didn’t ask him what it all meant or what the count…

May 29, 2020 Word for Word Media
Paddy O’Brien shares his experience of undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Paddy O’Brien (65) lives in Pinelands, Cape Town with his wife. They have two adult children. Diagnosis For 15 years, Paddy had a benign enlarged prostate, living with the condition of urgent, frequent urination. In April 2017, a routine PSA test raised concerns. He asked his specialist urologist, who had confirmed the enlarged prostate, about performing a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), a surgery used to treat urinary problems that are caused by an enlarged prostate. The specialist agreed, but recommended a needle-biopsy at the same time. The op was performed…