Jul 29, 2022 Word for Word Media
Dr Shivona Moodley expands on the common terminology that is used in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer in men with 1,4 million new cases being diagnosed in 2020, according to GLOBOCAN statistics. Southern Africa had the third highest worldwide mortality rates from PC. In South Africa, the National Cancer Registry 2014 report confirms that PC is the most common histologically-diagnosed malignancy in non-Caucasians, and the second most common cancer in Caucasians.  Routes of spread  PC starts in the cells of the prostate gland and the most common type of cancer found here is…

Jul 29, 2022 Word for Word Media
Andreas Kleynhans was first diagnosed with prostate cancer and then oesophageal cancer. He explains that how you think about your cancer determines your experience, adding that he decided to make something positive of it. Andreas Kleynhans (54) lives in Linden, Gauteng.  Prostate cancer  In March 2021, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer (Grade 1, slow-growing, small) after a routine check-up as I had an enlarged prostate for a few years already; active surveillance was advised.  Seven months later, it had metastasised to my hip bone and was Grade 4. This was devastating news as I learnt that this type of cancer…

Jul 29, 2022 Word for Word Media
We hear the pros and cons of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal exam (DRE) for prostate cancer screening. With prostate cancer predicted to be the most common cancer in SA by 2030, more men are choosing to go for screening to ensure early detection. If detected early, prostate cancer is potentially curable.  The Prostate Cancer Foundation of South Africa recommends informed patient-based screening in men with a life expectancy of more than 10 years in the following situations: From the age of 40 in black African men and in men who have a family history of prostate and/or…

Mar 28, 2022 Word for Word Media
Thanks to a successful joint prostate brachytherapy training workshop with Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) Department of Radiation Oncology and Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH) Urology Unit last year, this year 50 early prostate cancer patients will be treated with prostate brachytherapy at CHBAH. The first of the planned workshops was conducted in June 2021 at CHBAH and three patients with early stage prostate cancer were treated. Several specialist and training radiation oncologists, urologists and medical physicists got the opportunity of both observing and getting hands-on-experience doing prostate brachytherapy under expert guidance. BD, a medical technology company, agreed to sponsor the…

Dec 2, 2021 Word for Word Media
Genetic counsellor, Sarah Walters, educates us on the probabilities of inherited genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting men; approximately 1 in 8 men will be diagnosed during their lifetime. Mostly, it’s diagnosed in men aged 65 and older. Risk factors include lifestyle, age, and ethnicity.  Sometimes there is an inherited genetic predisposition to prostate cancer and this may have a considerable impact. Clues to understand whether your family may be at an increased risk include a family history of prostate and other cancers, such as breast cancer (in either men or women), ovarian cancer…

Oct 1, 2021 Word for Word Media
Black men have significant differences in incidence, presentation and outcome of prostate cancer compared to other racial groups. Multiple factors play a role including genetic differences and social determinants of health. Understanding these differences helps us to create better healthcare strategies for black men. Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in SA, surpassing basal cell cancer in the latest National Cancer Registry cancer report (2017).¹ PC is the second most common cause of death through a malignancy in SA, after lung cancer.² Internationally it has been found that black men with PC have worse outcomes than other…

Aug 2, 2021 Word for Word Media
Dr Anthony Smith expands on ways to adapt after prostate cancer treatment so sexual function can be improved and sexual intimacy enhanced. The prostate’s anatomy is central to the nerves, muscles and vessels that supply the genitals so any damage to this area can have profound consequences. Its therefore no surprise that men fear this cancer and its potential to substantially damage their sexuality and masculine identity. So, let’s look at the side effects. Surgical treatments A cornerstone of treatment is a radical prostatectomy, now done as a nerve-sparing procedure which has improved the outcome such that up to 75% of men can expect to…

Aug 2, 2021 Word for Word Media

Mandla Zondo tells us how losing his brother to prostate cancer in the same year he was diagnosed motivated him to lobby hope and in turn co-found CanSurvive Kwa-Thema Support Group. Mandla Zondo (72) lives in Springs, Gauteng. He is married and has two children and six grandchildren.  Mandla started his yearly prostate cancer screening in 2011.  In 2013, his GP referred him to a urologist as he had an enlarged prostate. Mandla’s prostate was so enlarged that it restricted urination and he had to undergo a cystoscopy (endoscopy of the urinary bladder via the urethra). He was then put…

Aug 2, 2021 Word for Word Media

Ferring in collaboration with The Prostate Cancer Foundation of South Africa are proud to present the first metastatic prostate cancer patient journey. This is the possible route of your treatment journey for your ease of reference and understanding. Click here to download a PDF of the metastatic prostate cancer patient journey.

References Moul J, et al. Rising serum PSA following local therapy for prostate cancer: Definition, natural history, and risk stratification. Official reprint from UpToDate. UpToDate. Waltham, MA, 2021. Kirby RS, Patel I. Fast Facts: Prostate Cancer. Eighth edition. Health Press Limited. Jan 2014. Kantoff PW, Taplin M-E, et al. Clinical…

Feb 5, 2021 Word for Word Media
Dr Lizette Louw informs us how PSMA therapy is a rapidly evolving area for metastatic prostate cancer treatment. What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a specialised area consisting of two arms: nuclear imaging which uses small amounts of gamma radiation to examine organ function, and nuclear therapy using alpha or beta particles.  In nuclear imaging, a radioactive atom is linked to specific molecules to guide imaging of specific organ systems. Similarly for nuclear therapy, a therapeutic radioactive atom is linked to various specific molecules which is absorbed by the tumour cells and the radiation is deposited within the…

Feb 5, 2021 Word for Word Media
Prof Shingai Mutambirwa gives us a better notion of what metastatic prostate cancer is and the outcomes of the various metastases. What is metastatic prostate cancer? When cancer cells from the prostate enter the blood and lymph vessels and travel to other parts of the body where they re-implant and grow to form secondary tumours or metastases, this is called metastatic prostate cancer or Stage IV.  At this advanced stage, the cancer is unfortunately no longer curable but can be contained for a period on appropriate therapies. The 5-year cancer specific survival for men diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer hovers between 30-40%.  Various studies…

Nov 30, 2020 Word for Word Media

We hear how the Prostate Cancer Foundation came about and the success of their latest Suit Up September campaign. SA prostate cancer stats Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in South Africa (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer).  If prostate cancer is detected in the early stages, the chance of survival after five years is over 98%. However, if the cancer has spread (metastasised), only approximately 30% of men survive.  Black African men have a 60% higher risk for prostate cancer and are twice as likely than white males to die from the disease.  Early detection through age appropriate…