May 1, 2016 Sandra

Siyamthanda Hlantshwayo is a resilient, 12- yearold boy who is fighting childhood cancer. It all began in April 2014, after his 10th birthday on 6 April 2014, when his mother, Thandekile, noticed lumps on his neck. “I panicked and immediately took him to a pediatrician; afraid he had mumps,” said the mother. To her surprise she was told that he has Lymphoma Cancer; a blood cancer that occurs when cells of the immune system called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, grow and multiply uncontrollably. In disbelief, Thandekile visited another pediatrician for a second opinion, who referred her son…

Dec 11, 2015 Laurelle Williams

When an adult gets cancer, it’s likely to start in the lungs, breast, colon, prostate or skin. When a kid gets cancer, it may be in the white blood cells or the nervous system, in the brain or bones, in the lymphatic system, muscles or kidneys. There are many different types childhood cancers. Below are the most common types of cancer in children. Lymphomas Tumours that start in the lymph glands are called lymphomas and these accounts for 11% of all childhood cancers. The body’s lymphatic system is made up of a collection of lymph nodes, each the size of…

Dec 1, 2015 Sandra

When you hear people talk about cancer, you usually assume they’re talking about adults. But children also get cancer and CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation SA has gone for gold by introducing its handcrafted loyalty programme, CHOC-olate, the first NGO loyalty programme in South Africa and possibly in the world! Oncology Buddies talks to Carl Queiros, Chief Executive Officer at CHOC.  When you hear people talk about cancer, you usually assume they’re talking about adults. But children also get cancer and CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation SA has gone for gold by introducing its handcrafted loyalty programme, CHOC-olate, the first NGO loyalty…

Sep 1, 2015 Sandra

When an adult gets cancer, it’s likely to start in the lungs, breast, colon, prostate or skin. When a kid gets cancer, it may be in the white blood cells or the nervous system, in the brain or bones, in the lymphatic system, muscles or kidneys. There are many different types childhood cancers. Below are the most common types of cancer in children. Lymphomas Tumours that start in the lymph glands are called lymphomas and these accounts for 11% of all childhood cancers. The body’s lymphatic system is made up of a collection of lymph nodes, each the size of…

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

Diet and nutrition is very important during childhood because they are still growing and developing. Good nutrition is particularly important when a child has cancer because the child’s growing body also has to cope with the various treatments and the side effects that come with them. The focus should be on preventing, or treating cancer related malnutrition, as prevention is always better than cure. Not all children react to cancer treatment in the same way. Many children have no problem with nutrition and are able to eat enough and have the strength and energy to maintain their normal levels of…

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

Cancer is no longer restricted to the middle age woman. The incidence of this disease now manifests itself over a lifetime; ranging from the very young to the elderly in both sexes. Available statistics in South Africa, report that approximately 1700 children (birth to 16 years) are diagnosed annually with cancer. The most prevalent is Leukemia, followed by Retino blastoma and then brain tumours. With early detection, it is reported that 77% of these cancers can be cured. During this difficult journey there is a range of aspects that should be taken into account to aid and help the patient….

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

The cancers that affect children are generally unique to those that affect adults and the incidence of childhood cancer is 150 in a million worldwide. In South Africa, one in 600 children are affected by cancer before the age of 16 – sadly, less than half of the children are diagnosed early enough and reach a treatment centre in time. According to Silvia Craucamp, Nurse Clinical Officer and Training Coordinator for Children’s Haematology Oncology Clinics (CHOC) in Gauteng, many children are diagnosed too late with an advanced stage of cancer for the treatment to have much chance of success and…

Dec 10, 2013 Laurelle Williams

The South African Children’s Tumour Registry reports that childhood cancer is relatively rare, representing about 1% of cancers in the total population. In South Africa, one in 600 children are affected by cancer before the age of 16. The encouraging news is that if diagnosed early, 70-85% of children can be cured. “Childhood cancer is generally curable and progress towards curing it has been made in developed countries where the overall survival rate for some common malignant tumours is about 80%. Early detection can save lives. And knowing the early warning signs can save your child’s life,” says founder of…