Sep 30, 2019 Word for Word Media
Sensei Ilze van der Merwe tells us how Kids Kicking Cancer (KKC) is giving hope and strength to childhood cancer patients and their families. Origin of KKC Kids Kicking Cancer was founded, in 1999, by Elimelech Goldberg, a black belt karate instructor and clinical assistant professor of paediatrics at Wayne State University in Michigan, USA.  The program is now running in over 60 hospitals, across five countries, and has positively impacted the lives of more than 6 000 children and their families, as well as the healthcare professionals treating them. How does KKC help children? KKC is designed to empower and uplift children who are battling…

Sep 26, 2018 Word for Word Media
We hear why honest communication is a cornerstone of good children’s palliative care. Good communication from all channels Communication is the cornerstone of all interaction and ensures relationship. However, poor communication can lead to misunderstandings, anxiety, resentment and, inevitably, a complete breakdown of trust.  Good communication practices in palliative care are crucial. Particularly when caring for very sick children and their families. This includes communication between the palliative care team members themselves; conversations with parents; communication between parents; and, most significantly, direct communication with the sick child.    A conspiracy of silence Children are among the most marginalised and vulnerable members of society…

Jun 1, 2018 Word for Word Media
Berna Harmse informs us about nutrition during childhood cancer. Cultivating healthy eating habits is part of the well-being of any child. Food helps build strength and strong immune systems and is also important for normal growth as well as brain development.  Children receiving cancer treatment need sufficient amounts of nutritious foods for all the same reasons, but with caution so as to prevent weight loss and long-term effects on normal development. The basics of good nutrition during childhood include: Eating regular balanced meals and snacks with a variety of nutrient-rich foods. Including fruit and vegetables daily (aim for at least…

Jun 1, 2018 Word for Word Media
CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation share the reality of childhood cancer, and celebrate Survivors, this International cancer Survivors’ Day. Statistics According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), around 150 per million children worldwide are diagnosed with cancer before the age of 15.  In South Africa, it’s estimated that we diagnosed between 70-80 per million children. Of those diagnosed most are in late stages – partly due to lack of knowledge – which leads to longer treatment, more disabilities and a lower survival rate. This can drastically improve with more knowledge shared about childhood cancer.   Increased survival rates “In the…

Sep 28, 2017 Word for Word Media
Lesedi Sekgololo tells us how Reach For A Dream Foundation made her dream of meeting celebrity chef, Siba, come true. Lesedi Sekgololo (15) stays in Lonehill, Gauteng with her mother, Victoria, and her two younger sisters. She also has an older brother and her father is based abroad. Misdiagnosed After numerous doctors’ appointments and even more misdiagnoses – stomach bug,       urinary tract infection, appendicitis, constipation, iron deficiency – with a doctor even asking Lesedi if she was anorexic, it was discovered that there was a mass growing between her right kidney and bladder. Seven months later…

Jun 5, 2017 Word for Word Media

As much as it is parental instinct to protect your child against traumatic news, such as a cancer diagnosis, it’s virtually impossible. Parents and the patient are entitled to know the full extent of the problem so they can be empowered and educated. The clinician’s job is to earn their trust, hold their hand through the journey, and make it as safe and pain-free as possible. That’s how Dr Monica Vaithilingum, a private paediatric oncologist and haematologist approaches her patients. She expounds on this topic.

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Mar 28, 2017 Word for Word Media

Discovery Health offers a snap guide to taking control when your child is diagnosed with cancer.

Cancer happens when cells grow out of control; normal cells turn into abnormal ones and then multiply rapidly, crowding out healthy cells. Instead of dying off and being replaced like normal cells, cancer cells live longer. Some cancers affect only a specific area, while others spread. The most common childhood cancers are unsurprisingly found in developing cells, such as blood and bone marrow (leukaemia), the immune system (lymphoma), the brain and nervous system (brain tumours and neuroblastomas), kidneys,…

Aug 1, 2016 Word for Word Media

September is International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month September is the gold ribbon month – marked as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month; this is a time where globally, countries honour and remember children and families affected by this rare disease, and help rally awareness on the early warning signs of childhood cancer. CHOC Childhood Cancer foundation SA is encouraging all South Africans to “Go for Gold” by purchasing the gold ribbon from the online CHOC Store or nearest CHOC offices. The ribbon is to be worn throughout the month of September. This will go a long way in highlighting the disease and showing…

Jun 16, 2016 Word for Word Media
Siyamthanda Hlantshwayo is a resilient, 12- year-old boy who is fighting childhood cancer. It all began in April 2014, after his 10th birthday on 6 April 2014, when his mother, Thandekile, noticed lumps on his neck. “I panicked and immediately took him to a pediatrician; afraid he had mumps,” said the mother.  To her surprise she was told that he has Lymphoma Cancer; a blood cancer that occurs when cells of the immune system called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, grow and multiply uncontrollably. In disbelief, Thandekile visited another pediatrician for a second opinion, who referred…

May 1, 2016 Word for Word Media

Siyamthanda Hlantshwayo is a resilient, 12- yearold boy who is fighting childhood cancer. It all began in April 2014, after his 10th birthday on 6 April 2014, when his mother, Thandekile, noticed lumps on his neck. “I panicked and immediately took him to a pediatrician; afraid he had mumps,” said the mother. To her surprise she was told that he has Lymphoma Cancer; a blood cancer that occurs when cells of the immune system called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, grow and multiply uncontrollably. In disbelief, Thandekile visited another pediatrician for a second opinion, who referred her son…

Dec 11, 2015 Laurelle Williams

When an adult gets cancer, it’s likely to start in the lungs, breast, colon, prostate or skin. When a kid gets cancer, it may be in the white blood cells or the nervous system, in the brain or bones, in the lymphatic system, muscles or kidneys. There are many different types childhood cancers. Below are the most common types of cancer in children. Lymphomas Tumours that start in the lymph glands are called lymphomas and these accounts for 11% of all childhood cancers. The body’s lymphatic system is made up of a collection of lymph nodes, each the size of…

Dec 1, 2015 Word for Word Media

When you hear people talk about cancer, you usually assume they’re talking about adults. But children also get cancer and CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation SA has gone for gold by introducing its handcrafted loyalty programme, CHOC-olate, the first NGO loyalty programme in South Africa and possibly in the world! Oncology Buddies talks to Carl Queiros, Chief Executive Officer at CHOC.  When you hear people talk about cancer, you usually assume they’re talking about adults. But children also get cancer and CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation SA has gone for gold by introducing its handcrafted loyalty programme, CHOC-olate, the first NGO loyalty…

Sep 1, 2015 Word for Word Media

When an adult gets cancer, it’s likely to start in the lungs, breast, colon, prostate or skin. When a kid gets cancer, it may be in the white blood cells or the nervous system, in the brain or bones, in the lymphatic system, muscles or kidneys. There are many different types childhood cancers. Below are the most common types of cancer in children. Lymphomas Tumours that start in the lymph glands are called lymphomas and these accounts for 11% of all childhood cancers. The body’s lymphatic system is made up of a collection of lymph nodes, each the size of…

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

Diet and nutrition is very important during childhood because they are still growing and developing. Good nutrition is particularly important when a child has cancer because the child’s growing body also has to cope with the various treatments and the side effects that come with them. The focus should be on preventing, or treating cancer related malnutrition, as prevention is always better than cure. Not all children react to cancer treatment in the same way. Many children have no problem with nutrition and are able to eat enough and have the strength and energy to maintain their normal levels of…

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

Cancer is no longer restricted to the middle age woman. The incidence of this disease now manifests itself over a lifetime; ranging from the very young to the elderly in both sexes. Available statistics in South Africa, report that approximately 1700 children (birth to 16 years) are diagnosed annually with cancer. The most prevalent is Leukemia, followed by Retino blastoma and then brain tumours. With early detection, it is reported that 77% of these cancers can be cured. During this difficult journey there is a range of aspects that should be taken into account to aid and help the patient….

Dec 10, 2014 Laurelle Williams

The cancers that affect children are generally unique to those that affect adults and the incidence of childhood cancer is 150 in a million worldwide. In South Africa, one in 600 children are affected by cancer before the age of 16 – sadly, less than half of the children are diagnosed early enough and reach a treatment centre in time. According to Silvia Craucamp, Nurse Clinical Officer and Training Coordinator for Children’s Haematology Oncology Clinics (CHOC) in Gauteng, many children are diagnosed too late with an advanced stage of cancer for the treatment to have much chance of success and…